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What The World Needs Is More Geniuses…

4.00 out of 5
(1 customer review)

20.00

• 30cm x 40cm
• High quality digital print
• Printed on 300gsm uncoated stock
• Prints are delivered in a postal tube

* Frame not supplied
* Fits into standard size “off-the-shelf” frames

SKU: 025 Categories: , , , Tag:
Description

What the world needs is more geniuses with humility, there are so few of us left.

A beautiful print inspired by the American pianist, composer, author, comedian, and actor Oscar Levant.

Oscar Levant

Oscar Levant (December 27, 1906 – August 14, 1972) was an American pianist, composer, author, comedian, and actor. He was as famous for his mordant character and witticisms, on the radio and in movies and television, as for his music.

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, in 1906, to an Orthodox Jewish family from Russia, Levant moved to New York in 1922, following the death of his father, Max. He began studying under Zygmunt Stojowski, a well-established piano pedagogue. In 1924, aged 18, he appeared with Ben Bernie in a short film, Ben Bernie and All the Lads, made in New York City in the DeForest Phonofilm sound-on-film system.

In 1928, Levant traveled to Hollywood, where his career took a turn for the better. During his stay, he met and befriended George Gershwin. From 1929 to 1948 he composed the music for more than twenty movies. During this period, he also wrote or co-wrote numerous popular songs that made the Hit Parade, the most noteworthy being “Blame It on My Youth” (1934), now considered a standard.

Around 1932, Levant began composing seriously. He studied under Arnold Schoenberg and impressed him sufficiently to be offered an assistantship (which he turned down, considering himself unqualified). His formal studies led to a request by Aaron Copland to play at the Yaddo Festival of contemporary American music on April 30 of that year. Successful, Levant began composing a new orchestral work, a sinfonietta.

At this time, Levant was perhaps best known to American audiences as one of the regular panelists on the radio quiz show Information Please. Originally scheduled as a guest panelist, Levant proved so quick-witted and popular that he became a regular fixture on the show in the late 1930s and 1940s, along with fellow panelists Franklin P. Adams and John Kieran, and moderator Clifton Fadiman. “Mr. Levant”, as he was always called, was often challenged with musical questions, and he impressed audiences with his depth of knowledge and facility with a joke. Kieran praised Levant as having a “positive genius for making offhand cutting remarks that couldn’t have been sharper if he’d honed them a week in his mind. Oscar was always good for a bright response edged with acid.” Examples include “I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin,” “I think a lot of Bernstein – but not as much as he does,” and “Now that Marilyn Monroe is kosher, Arthur Miller can eat her.”

Reviews (1)

1 review for What The World Needs Is More Geniuses…

  1. Sean Riegel
    4 out of 5

    :

    HA HA HA I’ll get one for the wife!!

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